• News
  • فار EN
  • Neïl Beloufa on the film set he built in a former factory outside Paris. Photo courtesy Sean Donnola (NY TIMES)
  • Neïl Beloufa in Conversation with Azar Mahmoudian

    Published in Catalogue of The Abraaj Group Art Prize 2018 10th Edition
    – Of Other Spaces

    AM
    I’ve been thinking a lot lately about art’s extended realities, which are not limited to spectatorship. Art has always produced its own reality, and has been determined by that reality in turn in all sorts of ways—infrastructurally, economically, hierarchically, institutionally—but this contiguous reality has been largely reduced to and focused on art’s dependence upon the viewer’s interpretational agency. Looking beyond this dependence, what do you think your artworks enact? I don’t necessarily mean their utilitarian aspect, but rather their actual (as opposed to conceptual) relation with reality, their own sense of agency.
    NB
    I think my practice is always trying to display the mechanics of how the ideology and authority of representation function. But rather than addressing the world or the reality directly, I do so by creating systems that place it at a distance. Until now, it has been my strategy never to be frontal—to try to get a hold of things that could be named without naming them, thus keeping a distance, and trying to let the viewer find out what it’s about for themselves. I guess I’m naive, too.

    AM
    Well, if I may, I think you’re both indirect and straightforward. Your forensic approach in pointing out mechanisms of representational regimes, forms of mass surveillance or speculative regimes, sometimes takes a rather literal and direct path. For instance, there’s the iconic element of the grid, which reappears as an embracing background in many of your works, including Data for Desire (Rationalized Room Series) (2015). Human emotions are speculated and turned into data, while private spaces, personal objects and humans themselves re-materialize within and via the grid; it serves as reference to the increasing cyber-spacialization of our lives, as well as the intangible materiality of computational systems. Nevertheless, your sculptural grids look like hasty, hand-made sketches, fragile and open, with a touch of color at times, some gum or a cigarette left here and there. I often feel cold and suffocated in front of accelerationist, future-oriented artworks, with their machine-generated imagery, Post-Internet aesthetics and evolutionary, ergonomic, slick-designed objects. But when looking at your works, it is as if you’re domesticating the grid, overcoming its alienating presence, breaking its gloomy curse. It’s like you’re doodling inside the grid!
    NB
    It’s a part of my system of work to make art the way humans do things—DIY, if you will. It lets us have some proximity to these alienating elements, to desacralize them and have some affection towards them. Even Data for Desire, in which one can see a criticism of control systems and the representation of humans through mathematics, ultimately remains a movie about love, youth, and a fiction that doesn’t work out. In a way, the idea is to include ourselves in the mechanics of criticism, because we cannot claim we aren’t willingly participating in these systems we feed and create.
    As for the cigarettes, the game is even more perverse—forcing these cold objects into being personal, leaving DNA traces on them, which also makes them into documents of their own construction. But it’s also a joke, as I’m pretty much always smoking when I make my art.

    AM
    Is the humor in your work an attempt to make it less didactic, or to reduce the bleakness of a dystopian future looming large? Or is it intended to highlight the cracks in a system which is not as efficient as it purports to be?
    NB
    Both. I think of art as power, a place where power is legitimized—often the same kind of power we criticize in our work. Of course, we cannot really solve a problem we are part of. So my way of playing with this short circuit, talking about it without falling into a dialectic opposition between good and bad, is humor. There is a form of cowardliness in there, or at least the acknowledgment that my naive belief that art could change society is clearly just that: a belief.

    AM
    For me, humor is rather a psychological reaction to the bipolarity we all feel, stuck as we are between those binaries, especially between hope and disappointment. It’s a means of bypassing the melancholia.
    NB
    I also think that desacralizing might be a way of including viewers in the conversation, rather than trying to tell them what I think, which has no specific value, since I don’t know much. But yes, it’s clearly also a way to produce things while being in a permanent cognitive dissonance. Doing things that inherently create a paradox is both a decision and a chance. So I guess we all find ways to participate and soften the complexity of it. The other solution would be to stop doing altogether, but for the moment, I still have a desire to act.

    AM
    I find the “benches” you recently presented in exhibitions in Sérignan and Tehran (Tropical Harvest, 2016) resonate both with units for residents of a labor camp and steamgoth cryogenic units for surviving an apocalypse. Where does the title come from?
    NB
    The benches change meaning according to their affect on the viewer and the ideology they want to place in these objects. I used titles that would look like commodity branding names, in order to suggest they might actually come from somewhere else: they might be industrial, or they might even be personal, like when kids name their teddy bear.
    The series was first produced by Museum Ludwig for the exhibition “Home Visit,” that took place not in the museum, but in a loft apartment that was on the market for sale. The benches were placed in the living room with pipelines hijacking the toilets.
    We hired a real estate agent that had to sell the apartment: he would have two types of communities visiting the space, both of which were people he could have sold the apartment to—art people/collectors, and actual apartment buyers—but he didn’t have the right to talk about the art. So the presence of the objects necessarily created a contradiction, sparked discussions about housing, migrants and so on, but interestingly enough, all I did was design a bunch of objects, place them in a certain context, and fix a conversation rule.

    AM
    I wonder in which direction would you like to navigate now? Or perhaps you don’t want to take any direction at all?
    NB
    I’m constantly trying to change my system or my strategy, because every system, once it gets functional, starts to reproduce the very mechanic that it tried to avoid and eventually becomes authority. So I try to contradict myself as much as I can, while always trying to do the same thing.

    AM
    Back to your comment about making a distance to address the world: I feel you are meandering between various distances and loops—not only critical distance, but visual, chronospacial and ethical distance as well. This constellation of multi-dimensional positions does not seem to direct us anywhere, other than self-referencing and intensifying the sensual experience of “taking position,” or “believing,” or not.
    NB
    I’ve tried new mechanics recently where I move my center of gravity towards what is supposed to be my opposite, to the other, to the “enemy.” Doing so, the practice gets out of its comfort zone and takes a chance at being criticized. By decentralizing it ethically and morally—in other words, by avoiding my own opinions—the work can ask more questions, including questions about its own production and my role in that process. I’m not sure if these attempts are virtuous, but it’s interesting to me because I learn a lot. I also think that such a movement, even if it plays on this self-referencing mind-f***ed dissonance, might help to separate layers of art, politics and communication in each object, which then makes oppositions and binary thinking impossible to apply.

    AM
    Perhaps it’s no coincidence that editing and assembling are your favorite methods of working.
    NB
    I think my brain is one of a film editor that works with associations in order to create meaning—the work is simply the forms that follow. My medium is much less “crafty” than it looks; it deals more with the relationships between objects, film and the viewer. This is the place where I try to work.

    AM
    Once, as we were talking in Tehran, you mentioned that you would like to establish a democratic, horizontal relationship between the visual and conceptual elements of your installations. This happens through your maximalist approach to juxtaposing the aesthetic tropes of mass media, combined with a guerrilla approach to filmmaking and experiments with studio material and modes of presentation—for instance, framed pieces hanging on the wall in a salon style—on top of which some representational tricks are also revealed, making a closed circuit. It is an inclusive system that stimulates a sense of equality between the elements, but it also defies any sense of an outside to this system, since its maximized inclusivity embraces its own critics as well. I was wondering if you could elaborate a bit on the politics of such dynamics?
    NB
    I think the political aspect of art is the way it’s made, distributed and received. But of course, the object itself remains art, which creates a conflict of interest between myself and my work: I have the belief that my objects are open, but I rationally know they are closed. It’s impossible to resolve.
    I feel this impossible resolution is everywhere
    in society, and this idea has become a driving force in my work formally. This is why I parasite my voice, my shows and my videos all the time, why I show the wires that make my TV work. let the lighting remain visible in my movies, or throw my cigarette butts or the garbage of the studio into my pieces. It’s a self-critical method, a bit like those that liberal countries use to prove they are “open,” that I push as much as I can so it deactivates itself. My works always say they are works, even if I would love for them to say something else.

    AM
    About your comment on the political aspect of art enacted in the way it’s made, distributed and received; I think this leads us back to our initial question of whether, and how, you might contribute to the systems of production, circulation and reception of your works. Let’s put the interpretative agency of the spectator aside for a moment, and think of other realms in which art institutes and legitimizes its own reality. How would you address the grids, representational mechanisms and their attached economies differently in this other realm? Would your only option be to criticize? Or could there be the potential for different actions?
    NB
    I’m not sure. I don’t know if my role as an artist is to change; I think it’s more about creating cracks and proposing the possibility of different mechanics.
    I think being politically active is something I would do as a human, but not as an artist. Both might be compatible as much as they might be contradictory. It’s the same conflict of interest we mentioned before.

    AM
    You travel a lot and make site-specific works. Apart from the socio-economic dynamics of the global art world, is there a specific reason for that?
    NB
    I’m interested in the difference (if any) between globalization, decentralized thinking, and appropriation mechanics. This is a big problem for me, and perhaps one that can’t be resolved, but I always try to push it further. Apart from that, there is the desire to believe in humanity, as stupid as that sounds. It’s the hope that you can talk about humans everywhere, from anywhere on earth, and that this might be interesting. But then again, maybe I’m wrong. Maybe this is just another liberal domination strategy.

    گفت‌و‌گوی نیل بلوفا و آذر محمودیان منتشر شده در کتابچه‌ی جایزه‌ی هنری گروه ابراج ۲۰۱۸
    - کیوریتور: میریام بن‌صلاح

    ترجمه: نامدار شیرازیان

    آذر محودیان
    به ‌تازگی، در مورد واقعیت‌های گسترده‌ی هنر، که به ناظر محدود ‌نمی‌شوند، زیاد فکر ‌می‌کنم. هنر همواره واقعیتِ خودش را تولید ‌کرده ‌است، و به ‌نوبه‌ی خود به شیوه‌های گوناگون- چه به صورت زیربنایی، اقتصادی، طبقاتی و بنیادی- توسط این واقعیت محدود ‌شده‌ است. اما این واقعیتِ مجاور به‌طور عمده بر وابستگیِ هنر به ساز و کارِ تاویل در مخاطب متمرکز و به ‌آن خلاصه شده ‌است. فراتر از این وابستگی، فکر می‌کنید آثار شما چه چیزی را وضع می‌کنند یا فعال می‌کنند؟ نه لزومن جنبه‌ی کاربردیِ‌شان، بلکه بیشتر منظورم رابطه‌ی حقیقیِ‌شان (در تقابل با رابطه‌ی مفهومی) با واقعیت است، قصد من عمیق شدن در مسایل اولیه و بنیادینی درباره‌ی عاملیت هنر در بنا کردن ساز و کار قدرت خودش است.
    نیل بلوفا
    فکر می‌کنم با شیوه‌ی فعالیت‌ام همواره تلاش‌کرده‌ام که ساز وکارِ عملکردِ قدرتِ بازنمایی و ایده‌اولوژی را نشان‌دهم. اما اغلب به‌جای این‌که مستقیمن از جهان یا از واقعیت بگویم، این کار را با خلق سیستم‌هایی که از آن (واقعیت) فاصله می‌گیرند انجام ‌می‌دهم. تا کنون، سیاستِ من این بوده ‌است که از مواجهه‌ی مستقیم حذر‌کنم- تلاش ‌می‌کنم بدونِ نام‌ بردن درباره چیزهایی کار کنم که نامِ مشخصی دارند، از ‌این‌ رو این فاصله را حفظ می‌کنم و می‌کوشم به بیننده فرصت بدهم که خودش اثر را کشف‌ کند.

    آ.م.
    خُب، به نظرم شما هم غیرمستقیم‌اید و هم رک ‌و‌ راست. برخوردِ پرسش‌گرایانه شما در اشاره به ساز و کارهای نظام‌های بازنمایی، صورت‌های گوناگون نظام‌های نظارتِ امنیتی و یا نظام‌هایِ گمانه‌زنی گاهی مسیری در پیش‌ می‌گیرند که عمدتن عینی و مستقیم است. برای مثال، عنصرِ نمادینِ شبکه، که به‌طورِ مکرر به مثابه‌ی پس‌زمینه‌ای که همه چیز را در بر می‌گیرد، در کارهای شما به‌چشم‌ می‌خورَد، در «داده هایی برای تخمین علاقه» (۲۰۱۵) احساسات انسانی با گمانه‌زنی به اطلاعات تبدیل ‌شده‌اند، درحالی‌که فضاهای خصوصی، وسایل شخصی و خودِ انسان‌ها دوباره در میان و از خلال شبکه مجسم می‌شوند؛ که ارجاعی‌ست به روندِ روبه‌رشد فضامندی ِسایبری زندگیِ ما، و نیز به مادیتِ نامحسوسِ سیستم‌های محاسباتی. در حالی‌که شبکه‌های (-ِ ساخته شده از میل‌گرد) مجسمه‌وار شما مثل اتودهایی شتاب‌زده به ‌نظر می‌رسند، شکننده و ناتمام، گاهی با ردی از رنگ، و با تکه‌های رها شده‌ی آدامس و سیگار در گوشه‌ و کنار. من اغلب در مقابل کارهای Accelerationist و آینده‌ محور احساسِ سرما و خفگی می‌کنم، با مجموعه‌ی تصاویر ماشینی‌شان، زیبایی‌شناسیِ پسااینترنتی و تولیداتِ تکاملیِ کاربرپسندِ ‌صاف و شیک. اما وقتی به آثارِ شما نگاه می‌کنم، گویا شبکه را در کارتان اَهلی‌کرده‌اید و با غلبه بر حضورِ از خودبیگانه‌کننده‌شان نفرینِ‌شان را باطل کرده‌اید. انگار درونِ شبکه (سیستم در بر گیرنده) برای خودتان خط‌خطی می‌کنید!
    ن.ب.
    بخشی از نظامِ کاریِ من این است که به روشی که همه کارهایِ روزمره‌شان را انجام‌ می‌دهند، هنر تولید کنم- اگر مایل‌اید می‌توان آن را DIY نامید. این کار به ما اجازه می‌دهد به این عناصر بیگانه نزدیک‌ شویم، از آن‌ها تقدس‌زدایی کنیم و عطوفت به آن‌ها نشان‌ دهیم. حتی داده‌هایی برای تخمین علاقه، که در آن نقد نظام‌های نظارتی و بازنمایی انسان‌ها توسط ریاضیات دیده ‌می‌شود، در نهایت داستانی است درباره‌ی عشق و جوانی و داستانی که درست از آب در نمی‌آید. به نوعی منظور قراردادنِ خودمان در ساز و کارِ نقد است، چرا که نمی‌توانیم ادعا کنیم، خودخواسته، در این نظام‌ها، که خوراک‌شان می‌دهیم و خلق‌شان می‌کنیم، دستی نداریم.
    درباره‌ی سیگارها، بازی شرورانه‌تر از این‌هاست. تحمیل شخصی بودن به این اشیای بی‌روح، به‌جا گذاشتن ردِ دی‌اِن‌اِی بر آن‌ها، که آن‌ها را به شواهدی از تولیدِ خود تبدیل می‌کند. یک مقدار هم برای خنده، چون تقریبن همیشه موقع کار در حال سیگار کشیدن‌ام.

    آ.م.
    آیا شوخی در کار شما تلاشی است تا اثرتان کم‌تر مستقیم و معلم‌مآبانه شود، یا به منظور کاهشِ نومیدیِ یک آینده‌ی تاریک ناگریز است؟ یا قرار است شکاف‌های نظامی را پررنگ کند که به میزانی که ادعا می‌کند کارآمد نیست؟
    ن.ب.
    هر دو. من هنر را قدرت می‌پندارم، جایی که در آن قدرت توجیه می‌شود و اغلب این همان قدرتی است که در کارمان نقدش می‌کنیم. البته، نمی‌توانیم مشکلی که در واقع خودمان بخشی از آن هستیم را حل‌کنیم. خُب روش من هم برای بازی کردن با این مدارِبسته، پرداختنِ به موضوع بدونِ درگیرشدن در مجادله‌ی خوب و بد، شوخی است. در آن حالتی از بزدلی وجود دارد، یا دستِ کم پذیرفتنِ این‌که باورِ ساده‌لوحانه‌ی من که هنر می‌تواند جامعه را تغییر‌دهد به ‌روشنی تنها همین است: یک باور.

    آ.م.
    به نظر من، در چنین بستری شوخی بیشتر یک واکنشِ روانی است به حسِ دوقطبی‌ بودنی که همگی نسبت به هنر داریم، در حالی که بین دوگانگی‌ها گیر افتاده‌ایم، به ‌ویژه بین امید و نومیدی. روشی است برایِ دور زدنِ افسردگی.
    ن.ب.
    من هم‌چنین فکر می‌کنم تقدس‌زدایی ممکن است راهی برای گنجاندن ناظرین (مخاطبین) در مکالمه باشد، به جای این‌که به آن‌ها بگویم نظرِ من چیست، که ارزشِ ویژه‌ای ندارد، چرا که من زیاد نمی‌دانم. اما بله، به‌وضوح راهی است برای تولید چیزهایی در یک ناهنجاریِ ادراکیِ مداوم. انجام ‌دادنِ کارهایی که به طور ذاتی تناقض خلق می‌کنند هم یک تصمیم است و هم یک تصادف. و همه‌ی ما راه‌هایی برای مشارکت در این پیچیدگی پیدا می‌کنیم. راهِ دیگر این است که به‌کل از فعالیت دست بکشیم، اما فِعلَن، من هنوز مایل‌ام کار کنم.

    آ.م.
    به نظر من نیمکت‌ها که شما به‌تازگی در نمایشگاه‌های‌تان در تهران و سرینیان ارایه کردید (خرمنِ استوایی، ۲۰۱۶) هم یادآورِ واحدهایِ مسکونیِ رفاهی دولتی است و هم سلولهایی به شکل و شمایل گوتیک و ماشین‌های عصر بخار‌ - برای بازماندگانِ یک آخرالزمان.
    ن.ب.
    معنای نیمکت‌ها بسته به اثری که بر بیننده می‌گذارند و جهان‌بینی‌ای که در حیطه‌ی آن بررسی می‌شوند در تغییر است. من اغلب از عنوان‌هایی استفاده کرده‌ام که شبیه نامِ تجاریِ کالاهای مصرفی باشند تا شاید تداعی شود که این عنوان‌ها از جایِ دیگری گرفته‌شده‌اند: شاید صنعتی باشند، یا حتی شخصی، مانند وقتی که بچه‌ها برای عروسک‌شان اسم ‌می‌گذارند.
    این مجموعه نخستین بار برای موزه‌ی لودویگ تولید شد، برای نمایشگاه دید و بازدید از خانه که نه در خودِ موزه که در یک آپارتمان بزرگ که برای فروش گذاشته ‌شده ‌بود برگزار‌ می‌شد. نیمکت‌ها در اتاق نشیمن قرار داده ‌شدند با لوله‌هایی که توالت‌ها را به این اتاق منتقل ‌می‌کرد.
    ما یک کارمندِ معاملات املاک استخدام کردیم که وظیفه‌اش فروشِ خانه بود: دو گروه متفاوت از این مکان بازدید می‌کردند، هر دو گروه کسانی بودند که او می‌توانست آپارتمان را به آن‌ها بفروشد - علاقه‌مندانِ هنر و مجموعه‌داران، و خریداران واقعیِ خانه - ولی او مجاز نبود درباره‌ی هنر صحبت کند. حضورِ آن اشیا لزومن تناقض‌آفرین بود، سببِ درگرفتنِ بحث‌هایی درباره‌ی مسکن، مهاجرین و غیره می‌شد، اما جالب این بود که کل کاری که من کردم طراحی یک سری اشیا بود، قراردادن‌شان در یک بسترِ مشخص و وضعِ یک قانون برای مکالمات.

    آ.م.
    برایِ من جالب است که بدانم که از این پس به کدام جهت پیش‌ می‌روید؟ یا شاید مایل نباشید اصلن جهتی درپیش ‌بگیرید؟
    ن.ب.
    من پیوسته تلاش‌می‌کنم که سیستم یا راه‌بُردم را تغییر دهم، چرا که هر سیستمی، زمانی که به‌ کار می‌افتد، شروع به تولید همان ساز و کاری می‌کند که پیش‌تر درصددِ اجتناب از آن بوده ‌است و سرانجام این ساز و کار صاحب‌اختیار می‌شود. درنتیجه من تلاش می‌کنم تا جایی که می‌توانم خودم را نقض کنم در حالی‌که می‌کوشم همان کارها را انجام دهم.

    آ.م.
    برگردیم به آن‌چه درموردِ فاصله ‌گرفتن برای صحبت از جهان گفتید: من احساس‌ می‌کنم شما در میانِ فاصله‌ها و حلقه‌های گوناگونی پرسه ‌می‌زنید - نه تنها فاصله‌ی انتقادی، بلکه فاصله‌ی تصویری، فضامکانی و هم‌چنین اخلاقی. این منظومه‌ی مواضعِ چندبُعدی به نظرنمی‌رسد ما را به جایی، جز خودارجاعی و تشدیدِ تجربه‌ی حسیِ موضع‌گرفتن، یا باورکردن و یا نکردن، هدایت ‌کند.
    ن.ب.
    اخیرن ساز و کار تازه‌ای در پیش‌گرفته‌ام و سعی می‌کنم مرکزِ ثقل را در جایی که قرار است ضِدِ من باشد، در دیگری، در ‘دشمن’، قرار ‌دهم. با این کار، روال از محیطِ امن خارج می‌شود و فرصتِ نقد شدن پیدا می‌کند. با تمرکززُداییِ اخلاقی و معنوی - به عبارت دیگر، با پرهیز از اعمالِ نظراتِ شخصی‌ام- اثر قابلیتِ پرسیدنِ سوالاتِ بیشتری می‌یابد، از جمله پرسش‌هایی در بابِ تولیدِ اثر و نقشِ من در این روند. مطمئن نیستم که این تلاش‌ها کاملن شرافتمندانه باشند، اما برای من بسیار جالب‌اند چون خیلی یاد می‌گیرم. هم‌چنین، به نظرم، چنین حرکتی، حتی اگر با خوداِرجاعانه بودن این ناسازگاریِ ذهنیِ لعنتی بازی کند و ور برود، ممکن است به جدا کردنِ لایه‌های هنر، سیاست و ارتباطات در هر چیز، کمک کند، و در نهایت به ناممکن شدنِ تعارُض و تفکرِ دوگانه منجر ‌شود.

    آ.م.
    شاید تصادفی نیست که اِدیت و سرهم سوارکردن (چیزها و لایه های مختلف) دو شیوه‌ی کاریِ موردِ علاقه‌ی شماست.
    ن.ب.
    فکر می‌کنم مغزِ من مثلِ مغزِ یک ادیتورِ فیلم است که روی پیوندها و تداعی‌ها کار می‌کند تا معنی خلق کند - اثر، به‌سادگی، فُرم‌هایی است که در ادامه می‌آید. مدیومِ من خیلی کمتر از آن‌چه به نظر می‌آید به صناعت متوسل می‌شود؛ بیش‌تر با روابطِ میانِ اشیا، فیلم و بیننده سر و کار دارد. این فضایی است که من می‌کوشم در آن کار کنم.

    آ.م.
    پیش‌تر وقتی در تهران صحبت می‌کردیم، شما گفتید مایل‌اید رابطه‌ی افقیِ دموکراتیکی بین عناصرتصویری و مفهومیِ چیدمان‌های‌تان برقرار کنید. این امر توسطِ برخوردِ حدِاکثریِ شما با کنارِ هم ‌گذاشتنِ استعاره‌های زیبایی‌شناسانه‌ی رسانه‌های جمعی رخ ‌می‌دهد، توام با یک برخوردِ پارتیزانی با فیلم‌سازی و تجربیاتی با ابزار و مواد استودیویی و روش‌های گوناگون ارایه - مثلن، قطعاتِ قاب‌شده‌ی آویزان از دیوارِ به روش نمایشگاه‌های کلاسیک. علاوه بر همه ترفندهایِ بازنمایی هم دارد دستشان رو می‌شود که یک مدارِ بسته به وجود میآورد. یک سیستمِ جامع و کامل به وجود می‌آید که حسی از برابری را بین عناصر برمی‌انگیزد. اما در عین حال هیچ بیرونی هم برای سیستمی که درست کرده باقی نمی‌گذارد، چرا که به سبب شمولِ حدِاکثری‌اش نقد خود را نیز شامل ‌می‌شود. جالب است اگر سیاست‌های چنین ساز و کاری را کمی باز کنید.
    ن.ب.
    به نظرم جنبه‌ی سیاسیِ هنر نحوه‌ی ساخته‌شدن، توزیع‌شدن و دریافتنِ آن است. البته، محصولِ نهایی هنر باقی ‌می‌ماند، که سببِ پدید آمدنِ یک اختلافِ نظر میانِ من و اثرم می‌شود: من بر این باورم که تولیدات‌ام ناتمام‌اند، اما از نظرِ منطقی می‌دانم تمام شده‌اند. ممکن نیست این اختلاف حل ‌شود.
    فکر می‌کنم این راه ِ‌حلِ ناممکن در جای‌جای جامعه وجود دارد، و این ایده به نیروی محرکه‌ی وجه فرمی کار من تبدیل شده است. به همین دلیل است که همیشه مزاحم صداها، نمایش‌ها و ویدیوهای‌م ‌می‌شوم و مثلن کابل‌های برق و تصویر را در معرض دید قرار می‌دهم. به نظرم ایرادی نیست اگر ادواتِ نورپردازی در فیلم دیده ‌شوند، یا اگر ته‌سیگار یا زباله‌ای از کارگاه‌ام را در یک اثر بیندازم. یک روش انتقاد از خود است، کمی شبیه آن‌چه در کشورهای لیبرال می‌گذرد که نشان دهند ‘انعطاف‌پذیر و باز’ هستند، این‌قدر در این رویه پافشاری می‌کنم تا خود را از کار بیندازد. کارهای من همیشه اعلام می‌کنند که کار هستند، حتی اگر از آن‌ها بخواهم چیزِ دیگری بگویند.

    آ.م.
    آن‌چه درباره‌ی محقق‌شدنِ جنبه‌ی سیاسی هنر از طریق ساخت، توزیع و دریافتِ آن گفتید؛ به‌نظرم ما را به این پرسشِ اولیه‌ بازمی‌گرداند که آیا و چگونه می‌توان در نظامِ تولید، گردش و دریافتِ آثار مشارکت کرد؟ بیایید سازوکارِ تاویل در مخاطب را فعلن کنار بگذاریم و گستره‌های دیگری را درنظر بگیریم، که در آن‌ها هنر واقعیتِ خودش را شروع و مشروع می‌سازد. در این قلمروِ متفاوت (هنر)، چگونه می‌توان به شبکه های دربرگیرنده، سازوکارهای بازنمایی و نظام‌های اقتصادیِ وابسته به آن پرداخت؟ آیا تنها گزینه نقد کردن است؟ یا در پیش‌گرفتن کنش‌های دیگری نیز بالقوه ممکن‌است؟
    ن.ب.
    مطمئن نیستم. نمی‌دانم که نقشِ من به عنوان هنرمند ایجادِ تغییر است؛ به نظرم این نقش بیش‌تر خلقِ شکاف‌ها است و پیشِ رو نهادنِ امکانِ وجودِ ساز و کارهای متفاوت.
    فکر کنم به عنوانِ یک انسان به فعالیت سیاسی بپردازم، اما نه به عنوان یک هنرمند. این دو به همان اندازه که ممکن است سازگار باشند احتمال دارد ناسازگار باشند. این همان اختلافِ نظری است که پیش‌تر به آن اشاره کردیم.

    آ.م.
    شما زیاد سفر می‌کنید و آثاری مختصِ آن مکان خلق می‌کنید. آیا به‌جز ساز و کار اقتصادی اجتماعیِ عرصه‌ی هنرِ جهانی، دلیلِ ویژه‌ی دیگری وجود دارد؟
    ن.ب.
    من به تفاوت (اگر وجود داشته ‌باشد) میان جهانی‌سازی، اندیشه‌ی نامتمرکز و سازوکارهای وام‌گیری در هنر علاقه‌مندم. این برای من یک مشکلِ بزرگ است، و شاید مسئله‌ای حل‌نشدنی، اما من همیشه روی حلِ آن پافشاری می‌کنم. به‌جز این، تمایل به باورِ انسانیت دارم، هرچند احمقانه به نظر برسد. این امید وجود دارد که بتوان همه و هر جا روی زمین درباره‌ی انسان‌ها صحبت کرد و این شاید جالب باشد. اما هنوز، شاید من در اشتباه باشم.
    شاید این هم یک راهبردِ سلطه جویانه لیبرال دیگر باشد.